The beauty and safety of digital (when analog/film photography doesn’t quite go to plan)…

The beauty and safety of digital (when analog/film photography doesn’t quite go to plan)…

It can be a very exciting process, dropping your two rolls of film off to the local photo lab. Then waiting a whole 5 days, enhanced with much mystery and anticipation until picking up the processed film negatives and scanned images to then view.

Recently, I’ve attempted more abstraction photography, this time using as my subject, a stunning orchid. My attempt was using two different film cameras, and naturally distorting the lens at the time of image capture. By the end of the two mini photo shoots that day, one of the cameras didn’t seem to last the distance due to some technical camera issues. However, I thought their would be enough images captured on that particular film (my fingers were crossed).

It all gets interesting, when I go to pick up my negatives and scans, and the photo lab technician explains that both films turned out to be blank negatives. From this I guess I see the beauty in a simple failure, as well as a lesson that maybe valuable enough in itself. My lesson here was there was not enough natural light beaming into my studio for for this photo shoot, and secondly to take a closer look at reviews before purchasing camera products in the future.

Luckily, at the end of both mini photo shoots, I had taken some digital stills with my Olympus Tough digital camera. They are not perfect images by any means, but still quite interesting and close to what I am trying to capture on film. I have a great love for analog/film photography and hope to translate similar types of effects of this work, from digital to film, using an outside studio setup next time. This would mean that I would be one step closer (in my many steps over time) to coming out with a body of work that would have a great uniqueness.

If you want to see a little more abstract photography, just click here

Take it easy there everyone! Cheers, Victoria

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‘Photography is magic’ -the magic within Charlotte Cotton’s latest book…

‘Photography is magic’ -the magic within Charlotte Cotton’s latest book…

So in the last few days, I’ve managed to get my hands on Charlotte Cotton’s latest book Photography is Magic (published by Aperture). After much success of Cotton’s original book The Photograph as Contemporary Art, it was an exciting to see that she had taken a leap into the world of photography abstraction. My first impressions of this photography book, was simply ‘abstract on acid’. I do mean this in quite a positive light, as these photography artists that Cotton has featured, are well advanced at literally thinking way out-of-the-box in terms of executing their works.

I  found a small portion of works that I absolutely loved. Give me the winning lottery ticket any day, and I would easily find several artists to help furnish any future palace of mine, as such. Such artists that shine for me artfully are, Jessica Eaton, Amir Zaki, Artie Vierkant, Taisuke Koyama and Hannah Whitaker. In my opinion, this book would certainly be a great source for any present or future student photographers, to show the vast and many directions that photography is heading now, and into the future, especially with digital. Overall it is a very heavy and decently sized  book for its 380 pages, including an essay by Cotton. This publication would be most valued in any photography book collection.

If I had to ask myself, whether one day, I could find my abstraction photography in such a book like this? And truthfully, I would say it would be a great aim. When I finally find my energy again, I certainly have a vast amount photography work ahead of me, to explore, develop and execute within my subject of abstraction.

Well, Easter is just around the corner… For any budding artists out there, hope it’s a sound chance to catch up on some artwork. And for the others of you, I hope you have a safe and happy Easter.

Warmest wishes to you all! Cheers, Victoria

 

The latest (spring-time 2015) abstraction photography work….

Recently, I feel we have had a reasonable spring here in Christchurch, New Zealand. As usual, the blossom trees around the city play a great part in beautifying things up. This blossom season, I was armed and ready with a new, yet modified camera to try out and to capture my  photographic abstraction work. Using some very expired Kodak 400 35mm film, I was able to achieve the following results:

In my opinion, each image is somewhat unique with good colour tones. I would be very keen to try out 200 ISO film, as it will reduce the grainy feel of the image when printing out large. Only using 1 film in this process during early October, I had no idea how things would work out using this new camera and taking into account 5-day film processing as well. Also, blossom season was very short this year due to the heat of the weather in the region (as the blooms opened up and fell from this blossom tree very quickly, within days, compared to the usual week or two it normally takes).

Anyhow with a head full of ideas for my next stages, I can’t wait to dabble in more abstraction photography soon.

Thanks for tuning in!

Abstract photography using blossom trees, blended with hues….

Greetings everyone, hope you’re all well out there…

These photographic pieces are my latest experimental creations. Using 35mm film, I have used my own natural distortion technique at the time of image capture. As works in progress, these images are still yet to be sized and properly titled. However these are a wee sample of what is yet to come with this range of distortion work.

If you have a favourite image here, don’t be at all be shy and share your thoughts in the comments…

Lastly, to all my viewers and friends, have a wonderful and safe New Years, and wishing each and everyone of you, a great year ahead!

Look forward to seeing you all again, on here, in the new year.

My warmest wishes, Victoria

‘Multi-layed imaging’ – two individual styles of 2014…

At the beginning of this year, I began experimenting with overlapping layers into one picture. For this first image I used 4 images from the same stand-point photographed in a North, South, East and West positioning. Then in post-production, I over-lapped them to become a single image. It made for an interesting photograph and I discovered from a viewer’s standpoint that the longer I looked at this blended multi-layered image, the more the naked eye could slowly start distinguishing each of the scenes within the single photograph.

And recently in August,  I tried another style where I blended the same single image over and over. Using a digital photograph of a building just off the city’s square, I wanted to give some kind of link to the past earthquakes that this region has endued over the recent years, by giving a visual shaking effect. Both photographs are intriguing styles that I intend to explore further.

My chance at capturing this year’s blossoms, both digitally and film based…

Spring is in the air, here in  New Zealand, and what a fantastic chance it is capture some of the beauty around these parts.

Unfortunately for me, I have been battling chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS/M.E.) for the last 10 months. However, I am slowly progressing into better health as I have been managing to keep my spirits high and look for the little pleasures around me.

Magically, in the past several days, I have managed to shoot off 3 rolls of colour film using my natural-water-distortion-technique I devised a couple of years ago (check out my Water Distortion Photography and the June Archive for earlier examples). So hopefully there will be some exciting results when I get those films back from the Kodak Photo Lab…

In the meantime these images here are digital shots from my Canon EOS 7D, where I have used a large depth of field.

And one last thing for all those budding photographers out there… A beautiful quote to take away with you….

‘The only photographer you should ever compare yourself to, is the one you use to be”  -Unknown

Take care of yourselves everyone, and my warmest wishes, Victoria

My recent graduation, Lightroom 5 and some meaningful photography quotes…

Well, for some good news…I’ve graduated from The Photography Institute with a diploma in Professional Photography. It took me just over 10 months. Hopefully when I get my health and energy back in the near future, I’ll be using all my knowledge to its full advantage.

As my graduation present to myself, I have purchased a new software called Lightroom 5. I think the most rewarding aspect I have learnt (which came right at the end of the course, after my final submission and the feedback I received) was that I need to correct the slight lens distortion that happens when taking cityscape images. With the help of such software applications such as Lightroom 5, I understand just a couple of clicks of the computer-mouse and an image’s horizon becomes level, and secondly, the image’s buildings become more upright.

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